OFluxo http://www.ofluxo.net Exploring Visual Culture. Thu, 29 Jun 2017 01:46:36 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.7.5 http://www.ofluxo.net/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/cropped-ofluxo_lnk-32x32.png OFluxo http://www.ofluxo.net 32 32 ‘‏New Day New Money To Be Made’ first shows at Komplot http://www.ofluxo.net/%e2%80%8fnew-day-new-money-to-be-made-first-shows-at-komplot/ http://www.ofluxo.net/%e2%80%8fnew-day-new-money-to-be-made-first-shows-at-komplot/#respond Thu, 29 Jun 2017 00:54:07 +0000 http://www.ofluxo.net/?p=28052 New Day New Money To Be Made is a quote taken from the pop song Black Barbie by Nicki Minaj addressing the ambient precarity. Time is money. Today’s capitalist society hardly leaves us the time to perform one mission, and we already need to look for the next one. No time to think. This exhausting rhythm of searching for work, finding new clients, making the job and getting paid; This constant reinvention of the self in every challenging moment of uncertainty, became the obsessive, repetitive patterns of our post-colonial, post-proletarian, post-work conditions. These routines in which you are kept captive, prevent the possibility to break through. Precarity is constructed to make change impossible. What about social welfare? What about psychological welfare? Reality check? Paycheck. No time to lose.

The series New Day New Money To Be Made gathers six solo shows opening from Friday to Saturday 4 to 8pm chaussée de Forest 90 Vorste steenweg 1060 Brussels with the support of Vlaamse Gemeenschapscommissie and Fédération Wallonie-Bruxelles.

2 – 3 June : Julien Goniche

9 – 10 June : Emeline Depas

16 – 17 June : Jonathan Boutefeu

23 – 24 June : Romain Juan

30 June – 1 July : Liga Spunde

7 – 8 July : Noémi Merca & Bora Akinciturk

Beautiful Portraits of Artists – Julien Goniche

‏The title ‘Beautiful Portraits Of Artists’ plays on the misunderstanding of who makes what portraits of who? The serie of the seven portraits suggest that the identity of this artist is about working on colors, light, position of the model, composition, background… in other words, classical recipe of fine art. Be it real or fake art or artists, that is not the question. It’s a creation, a falsification or an authentification of a practice, a labor, a life style, a posture…

Text by Sonia Dermience

Twig – Emeline Depas

‏The twig evokes a fragility, a tickle but not only.
‏For some the dandelion is a weed, a dead living in nature; yet here it is humanized, illuminated, sacralized. It is the unconscious speaking.
‏In ‘Twig’, Emeline Depas articulates canvases and objects. The paintings are as electric as dialectical. One is vegetal, the other is animal – visceral and horned.
The outer versus the guts.
‏The heart of space is inhabited by a nest, a hybrid shelter – by its plural composition. Actually in the exhibition it is possible to find all forms of nest, warm, complex, inverted.
‏The strength of the works relies on the dialectic that takes place between a visual either candid or aggressive, between an evocation now natural and then organic.

Text by Milena Oldfield

Jonathan Boutefeu : If you build it, they will come « whispered »

‏The door-to-door utopia or a sweetened vision of reality.
‏It is through toil that one gains access to comfort: the value of work – in the Protestant way as a form of salvation- or comfort at any price ?

‏The work of Jonathan Boutefeu casts an ironic look at neoliberalism and distorts its codes: the proselytic utopia reflected in the eyes of the picture-perfect family; three fluorescent cushions in touch with concrete slabs of different colors, different odors: we find sensations where least expected.
‏A pre-millennial trend proceeded and mocked by the artist.

Text by Milena Oldfield


Romain Juan – Le succès est de survivre

‏Shapes and colors
‏
”Des corps hystériques mélangés entre eux forment des constellations de bras et de jambes coupées, assemblées à l’envers. Plastique chair, plastique blanc.
Des robes sac poubelles, des vibrations de teintes vives, des motifs répétés.
Shapes and colors.
‏C’est cette attitude émerveillée pour la simple poésie des volumes et des couleurs de ce qui l’entour que développe Romain dans son travail. Pas de fashion show, mais une aisance décomplexée à explorer les codes esthétiques qui se mangent les uns les autres, créant de la résonance visuelle.”

Text by Laurie Charles

– – –

New Day New Money To Be Made
At Komplot, Brussels

2 – 3 June : Julien Goniche

9 – 10 June : Emeline Depas

16 – 17 June : Jonathan Boutefeu

23 – 24 June : Romain Juan

Komplot

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‘Silhouette’, Group exhibition at Et al.etc, San Francisco http://www.ofluxo.net/silhouette-group-exhibition-at-et-al-etc-san-francisco/ http://www.ofluxo.net/silhouette-group-exhibition-at-et-al-etc-san-francisco/#respond Wed, 28 Jun 2017 10:29:24 +0000 http://www.ofluxo.net/?p=28010 Curated by by Kevin Krueger and Aaron Harbour, Silhouette is the most recent installment at Et al.etc, San Francisco.  Silhouette presents works by Loney Abrams & Johnny Stanish, Nico Colón & Grant Gutierrez, Gracie DeVito, Fox Hysen, Brian Longe, Ruby Sky Stiler, Christine Wanguntil and runs until July 17.

I go out to find
The one with whom I’ve seen all hours’ moons
Once the curtains lifted
And he said, “I only swim to you”
Language is such a play –
He called his exit but his eyes irresolute
What pasts still sit today?
I feel I’m walking around in blue
He can hear me sing
He can hear me sing
Though he is far, I’ll never lose sight of him
He turned to me then looked away
A silhouette
A silhouette
Still returns to me
I’ll hand him his coat
It’s exactly where he left it long ago
We’ll fall all over floorboards
I lose my breath just envisioning the scene
Mysteries that wake up late – the table’s set
And the painting of his face
No time to hesitate
I cede all my light and play abandoned fool
-Julia Holter, Silhouette

Installation view

Installation view

Installation view

Installation view

Installation view

Installation view

Installation view

Installation view

Installation view

Brian Longe
The East is Red Number One, 2014
Graphite & acrylic on raw canvas
113 x 86 inches

Brian Longe
The East is Red Number Two, 2015-16
Graphite & acrylic on raw canvas
112 x 89 inches

Brian Longe
They Will Take My Island IV, 2017
Graphite & acrylic on canvas paper & birch panel
22 x 26”

Christine Wang
To Buy or Not To Buy, 2013
Acrylic, tinsel and fabric on plastic
60 x 50 inches

Christine Wang
Untitled (Darren Wilson) & Untitled (George Zimmerman), 2017
Xerox, acrylic and gold leaf on cardboard
16 x 12 inches

Fox Hysen
Dream House with Shower, 2017
Oil, enamel, clay and found objects in wooden frame
9 x 10.5 inches

Fox Hysen
Painting as Theater, 2017
Oil, acrylic and cotton
70 x 60 inches

Fox Hysen
Self Portrait with Grid, 2017
Oil, screen, and pastel on canvas
36 x 48 inches

Gracie DeVito
Mountains, 2016
Oil on vellum
17 1⁄2 x 23 inches

Loney Abrams & Johnny Stanish
Escape, 2017
UV print on handmade paper (pulped New York Times, copper foil, incense wrapper, Dr. Bronner’s soap label,
Every Day Detox Tea, milk thistle root, rose petals, magnesium chloride bath salts,
Electrolyte Plus+ powder, bee pollen) UV print on mat board, artist’s frame
26 x 22 inches

Loney Abrams & Johnny Stanish
Trap, 2017
UV print on handmade paper (pulped Wall Street Journal, copper foil, green tea, price tag, RAW rolling paper,
magnesium chloride bath salts, dandelion root, chrysanthemum buds), UV print on mat board, artist’s frame
26 x 22 inches

Nico Colón & Grant Gutierrez
Spencer Avenue, 2017
Installation throughout space
Edition of 4 +Ap

Nico Colón & Grant Gutierrez
Spencer Avenue, 2017
Installation throughout space
Edition of 4 +Ap

Nico Colón & Grant Gutierrez
Spencer Avenue, 2017
Installation throughout space
Edition of 4 +Ap

Nico Colón & Grant Gutierrez
Spencer Avenue, 2017
Installation throughout space
Edition of 4 +Ap

Ruby Sky Stiler
Untitled, 2014
Woven book pages, spray paint
10 x 7 inches

Ruby Sky Stiler
Untitled, 2014
Woven book pages, spray paint
10 x 7 inches

Ruby Sky Stiler
Untitled, 2015
Stained Baltic birch
28 x 18 x 10 1/4 inches

Ruby Sky Stiler
Untitled, 2015
Stained Baltic birch
28 x 18 x 10 1/4 inches

Installation view

– – –

Silhouette
at Et al.etc., San Francisco
Curated by Kevin Krueger and Aaron Harbour
w/ Loney Abrams & Johnny Stanish, Nico Colón & Grant Gutierrez
Gracie DeVito, Fox Hysen, Brian Longe
Ruby Sky Stiler, Christine Wang

June 17 – July 15, 2017

Et al.etc.

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Spiros Hadjidjanos at Wschód, Warsaw http://www.ofluxo.net/spiros-hadjidjanos-at-wschod-warsaw/ http://www.ofluxo.net/spiros-hadjidjanos-at-wschod-warsaw/#respond Tue, 27 Jun 2017 08:51:50 +0000 http://www.ofluxo.net/?p=27998 Opening of the solo show of Spiros Hadjidjanos will inaugurate new permanent space of Wschód at new location.

Spiros Hadjidjanos makes the mostly invisible world of technology tangible in his artworks made with fiber optic light, wireless routers, and electronic circuits, among other modern technology. In “Networked Gradient,” fire optics arch overhead in a darkened room, connecting wireless routers and creating a pulsing Arcade. The built architecture suggests the technological inventions of today are equally important to history as the development of the arch by the ancient Romans. Connections between inventions of the past and present, as well as the man-made and organic, are central to Hadjidjanos’ art practice. Such works as “Network Topologies,” suggest an inherent harmony between the artificial and natural worlds. In these ultraviolet prints of microchips, one sees the same symmetry and nodal networks that are central to the beauty of flora and fauna.

Anthemion
3D Print, Aluminium coating
36.07 x 48.54 x 9 cm
2015

Anthemion
3D Print, Aluminium coating
36.07 x 48.54 x 9 cm
2015

Anthemion
3D Print, Aluminium coating
36.07 x 48.54 x 9 cm
2015

Transmission in-itself
Used Apple Keyboard A1243, Blown Glass
40 x 40 x 78 cm
2014

Network/ed Arcs
Wireless routers,custom router firmware,fiber optic
light,electronics, dimensions variable
2014/2017

Network/ed Arcs
Wireless routers,custom router firmware,fiber optic
light,electronics, dimensions variable
2014/2017

Network/ed Arcs
Wireless routers,custom router firmware,fiber optic
light,electronics, dimensions variable
2014/2017

Anthemion
3D Print, Aluminium coating
36.07 x 48.54 x 9 cm
2015

Where are the people that talk on the radio?
35 digital images in 35 CDs, log
202 cm, 201 cm, 207 cm
2008/2017

Where are the people that talk on the radio?
35 digital images in 35 CDs, log
202 cm, 201 cm, 207 cm
2008/2017

– – – –

Spiros Hadjidjanos
at Wschód, Warsaw
27.5 – 30.6 2017

Wschód

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KNIFE SPITS ICE: Frederick Bristow interviews SWAN MEAT and YOSHITAKA HIKAWA http://www.ofluxo.net/knife-spits-ice-frederick-bristow-interviews-swan-meat-and-yoshitaka-hikawa/ http://www.ofluxo.net/knife-spits-ice-frederick-bristow-interviews-swan-meat-and-yoshitaka-hikawa/#respond Fri, 23 Jun 2017 10:10:35 +0000 http://www.ofluxo.net/?p=27933

KNIFE SPITS ICE:
Frederick Bristow interviews
SWAN MEAT and YOSHITAKA HIKAWA

 
 

“KNIFE SPLITS ICE” is the latest collaboration from experimental musicians Yoshitaka Hikawa and Swan Meat. Centred around themes of surgery and security, this EP is cold and clinical – exactly as the title might suggest.

Having collaborated on tracks in the past (“Wilt” and “BX3 HEADSPACE”), this EP is an elaboration and evolution in sound for both artists. Both prolific creators in their own right, this EP seamlessly blends what you might consider the signatures of both. The more ‘sound art’ motif-centred compositions of Yoshitaka Hikawa blend seamlessly with the brutal rhythmic reprises and spoken word recordings one might associate with Swan Meat. Hearing both these names together paints a visceral and immediate idea of what to expect – but this EP has plenty of surpises.

 
 


‘everywhereigoicarryaknife’

 
 

1. Could you talk a little about the collaboration process and how this came about? I understand you have collaborated on tracks in the past (“Wilt” and “BX3 HEADSPACE), but what was the driving force behind creating an EP together?

YH: “BX3 HEADSPACE” was our first collaboration. We send stems to each other, edit them, send back and edit, etc. I was interested in her perspective before our first collaboration. Still now it gives me inspiration; to sync our madness in a track’s unpredictable flow.

SM: We’ve been collaborating for over a year now and figured it was about time some of these sounds were sent forth into the universe.

 
 

2. Following on from this, I found it interesting that I could identify which sonic motifs were made by who; some phrases are distinctly Yoshitaka or SM’s. Does this speak to the internet-based collaborative process?

YH: I don’t necessarily have this consciousness- through the editing process, the tracks are mixed and remixed. Certain [original] phrases get lost.

SM: I’d be interested in hearing which bits you thought were ours, respectively. The collaboration process isn’t necessarily additive, here, & no sound exists monolithically within the context of our work; most of what’s done between the exchange of stems is resampling; the source audio in question is obscured, disappears.

 
 

3. Conceptually, how would you describe this EP? What was your intention behind the concept?

YH: We thought a lot about security, comfort/discomfort, & safety. It’s hard to describe beyond these words.

SM: I think the “concept” behind the EP, if there is one, only emerged when we decided to call the thing an EP: when we were selecting song titles, ordering the tracks, etc. Furthermore, this concept’s vocabulary is aural; what’s most interesting about the tape is, I think, our (mostly) subconscious ability to synchronize workflow & compose as one sonically linked body– rather than 2 separate-&-apart musicians.

 
 

4. Could you elaborate on the title, “KNIFE SPLITS ICE”? To me this seems to embody both the clinical and cold feelings in this EP.

YH: Exactly – the clinical & the cold [frame] our operation’s atmosphere. [The title] “KNIFE SPLITS ICE” is refers to the motif in the EP’s first track, “everywhereigoicarryaknife”.

SM: My experience growing up in-&-out of hospitals as a young person has directly informed the way I process & make sound. For some time, the cold & the clinical were my norm. It’s hard to shake this vocabulary. “Knife Splits Ice” refers also to an image I kept coming back to, that of the uncanny surgical procedure: a knife cutting in half, perfectly, a chunk of ice: no melting, no shards. Two halves, like frozen lungs.

 
 

YOSHITAKA HIKAWA

 
 

5. Is there a particular importance to the choice of vocal samples that runs throughout the album? Notably, there is a spoken word piece on the 4th track that follows an almost voyeuristic field recording of conversation between a group of women.



YH: I love the sounds & inflections of the voice. I often use [the voice] in my solo work.

SM: That particular conversation is one recorded between my best friend & myself while watching fireworks on NYE in Berlin, whilst wearing 3D glasses & being drunk. Vocal bits are resampled t/out our work, but the spoken word pieces usually come directly from my personal brainstorming process; i.e., before I begin working on a track I might write something that helps me figure out, say, the narrative path I want it to follow or the kind of sounds I want to source or make. Sometimes it feels appropriate to then bring those notes into the actual track.

 
 

6. To me, there is quite a clinical feeling to this EP. In particular, references to surgery and bodily parts (track 2). @SM: You have mentioned in a previous interview having spent most of your childhood / adolescence in and out of hospital. Is there any relation between your experiences there and the surgical concept of this EP? (If this is too personal I will leave out / you don’t have to answer!! <3)

SM: See my answer to question 4. Most certainly. We built “Casual Surgical Slang” around a handful of samples drawn directly from the hospital atmosphere. Re-contextualizing some of these sounds – those that kept me both alive & motionless – the hospital bed moving up and down, a breathing bag deflating, etc. – has been part of my healing process.

 
 



7. Both of you have different contexts and backgrounds to your work. Where do you feel this EP stands in respects to the ‘Experimental Club’ scene of SM and the more ‘Sound Art’ approach (fair to say?) of Yoshitaka? (I understand the two are not at all mutually exclusive – perhaps the wording is not quite right)

YH: [We see] this EP as a collection of scraps, memorandums of no context. Most people listening to our music will find it via internet search, without this context [you refer to], so previous classifications of our work don’t matter. There is no memory of experience. Besides, “club music” and “sound art” are being consumed more & more at the same time, as the same thing. The knife of the EP breaks the old contexts; we dislike it when our work is classified within a specific genre or genealogy.

SM: As I said previously, the great thing about working with a collaborator you really vibe with is the way such collaborations challenge you to shake off the trappings of your old, worn-out workflow and in the wake of these old clothes learn to compose in harmony. So that’s where the EP stands: in this wake, at the crosshair of learning & unlearning.

 
 


8. What is the thread that connects these 5 tracks together?


YH: From our beginning [as collaborators] through now and into the future.

 
 

9. How would you like this piece to be consumed? 



YH: I’d like it to be consumed in the far future when we are no longer alive; I hope someone will dig around in an ancient tape collection and listen to it as an artefact of 2017.

 
 

SWAN MEAT

 
 

10. Another recording that stuck out to me was the use of a field recording of fireworks towards the end of track 4. I have personally used recordings of fireworks to convey a sense of melancholy in one of my works. What was the intention behind this? (perhaps this is too specific / too much of my personal interest!)

SM: The fireworks are actually a second-hand artefact – I spent a lot of time, actually, trying to muffle them w/ 8-band EQ magic and eventually gave up, seeing as how they work within the context of the track’s melancholy. I understand why the recording feels impactful: fireworks always convey a sense of loneliness & longing – they’re such a hackneyed symbol of celebration but nonetheless they recall childhood, as such recalling innocence lost. Anyway, I was more interested in the half-heard conversations in the foreground of the recording: ohmygod, take my picture!

 
 

11. Another personal point of interest that I find in this EP is the idea of security and surveillance. On track 1, the skittering vocal samples of “everywhere I go I carry a knife”, along with writing, wet and mechanical samples instils in me a schizophrenic, gritty, dystopic feeling.

SM: The title of this track – as well as the vocal sample at the beginning – come from the final line of a poem I wrote about diving into the depths of mania whilst living in Los Angeles. The track began as a simple lyre arrangement and expanded from there.

 
 

12. Can we expect more collaborations of this nature in the future?

YH: 1000% I hope.

 
 

Yoshitaka Hikawa is an experimental musician based in Tokyo, Japan. He is a prolific creator and collaborator with a distinctive sound. I became familiar with his collection of sound works, “A_frontal_lobotomy” on Soundcloud and have followed since.

Available at: https://soundcloud.com/yoshitaka-hikawa-1

Swan Meat is an experimental musician who interweaves spoken word into crushing, perc-heavy club compositions. I found her work through various mixes she has done for NTS, Disc Magazine and Radar Radio.

Available at: https://soundcloud.com/swanmeat

Interviewer: Frederick Bristow

Cover Photo: Monia Ben Hamouda

 
 

KNIFE SPLITS ICE
by Swan Meat & Yoshitaka Hikawa

Available as limited edition clear cassette or digital album on Apothecary Compositions:
https://apothecarycompositions.bandcamp.com/album/knife-splits-ice

 
 

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‘Alluring shapes, tempting spaces’ Curated by Domenico de Chirico at Galerie Eva Meyer http://www.ofluxo.net/alluring-shapes-tempting-spaces-curated-by-domenico-de-chirico-at-galerie-eva-meyer/ http://www.ofluxo.net/alluring-shapes-tempting-spaces-curated-by-domenico-de-chirico-at-galerie-eva-meyer/#respond Thu, 22 Jun 2017 10:47:26 +0000 http://www.ofluxo.net/?p=27905 Where the I-world relationship, understood as a nucleus of phenomenological thinking, takes on the character of intentionality, it becomes necessary to investigate pure consciousness that allows the realisation of the totality of subjective and world experience. The German word Erlebnis, translated with the expression “lived  experience” or “living” indicates the personal and unitary aspect for which the contents of consciousness are not passively taken but acquired in a living way in the flow of it. Because of its dynamic nature, Erlebnis has been considered to be the essential condition for capturing all that is life, whether it is the individual, historical, artistic, religious, etc. which escape the purely definitive methods of natural sciences.

And so it is in sharp contrast with certain positivistic reductions that consider this relationship as a simple physiological, mechanical and associative process. As Edmund Husserl states,the crisis of science comes from the fact that the original sense of experience has been lost, that is, the intuitive experience of the world of life which is the perceived perceptual world.
Far from any associative and behaviorist setting and out of psychic content, this kind of subjectivity of personal experience is ideally oriented to investigate, shape, and define the identity of the image as a way to reconfigure our sensory experience of vision.

Such an experiential approach is perhaps the ideal one to take in front of a work and what appears to in play in “Alluring shapes, tempting spaces” is the experience of a series of references to Erlebnis, an internal game between the works on display, an Erlebnis ping-pong, as if the hand had disappeared before completing the form or even as if it had never disappeared while keeping it in the hollow of a space that becomes hostile: this makes these figures, perpetually in tension (Tempting), exhaling a stimulating (Alluring) past experience but still in the itinerary.  The presence of iconic elements and recognisable cultural references emphasises such an approach as it marks the difference betweenprocedural experience and possible pre-established schemes, denouncing the flow of Erlebnis outside these.  The central pivot of this thematic constellation is the question of the relationship between the formal and material components of the cognitive process that evolves from the binomial into a single sensorial experience.

Domenico de Chirico
May 2017

Transated by Vashti Ali

Exhibition view

Exhibition view

L: Oren Pinhassi
Towel Snake (white #2), 2016
21,59 x 27,94 x 26,67 cm

R: Rubén Grilo
Remelt Version Two. AKA Why Can’t I Like
Mast Brothers’ Bars?, 2016
230 x 120 cm

L: Nicolas Boulard
Cuve mélancolique #2, 2016
100 x 70 cm

R: Adriano Costa
Piece, 2014
126 x 88 x 4 cm

T: Gerda Scheepers
64 A/B (Blue), 2017
78,5 x 62,5 x 5,5 cm

B: François Durel
They tempted to tune the dense, 2016
200 x 100 x 110 cm

R: Nicolas Boulard
Cuve mélancolique #2, 2016
100 x 70 cm

T: Gerda Scheepers
64 A/B (Blue), 2017
78,5 x 62,5 x 5,5 cm

B: François Durel
They tempted to tune the dense, 2016
200 x 100 x 110 cm

Gerda Scheepers
64 A/B (Blue), 2017
78,5 x 62,5 x 5,5 cm

L: Manuel Burgener
Untitled, 2017
44 x 26 x 46 cm

C: AndyMeerow
Untitled, 2017
106,7 x 76,2 cm

R: Michel de Broin
Logged on, 2015
245 x 28 x 50 cm

L: Manuel Burgener
Untitled, 2017
44 x 26 x 46 cm

C: AndyMeerow
Untitled, 2017
106,7 x 76,2 cm

R: Michel de Broin
Logged on, 2015
245 x 28 x 50 cm

T: Gabriele Beveridge
Skimming the daydream, 2017
62 x 38 x 20 cm

R: Adriano Amaral
Untitled, 2017
Dimensions variable

Adriano Amaral
Untitled, 2017
Dimensions variable

– – –

 ‘Alluring shapes, tempting spaces’
Curated by Domenico de Chirico
at Galerie Eva Meyer
w/ Adriano Amaral, Gabriele Beveridge, Nicolas Boulard, Manuel Burgener,
Adriano Costa, Michel de Broin BROIN, François Durel, Rubén Grilo,
Andy Meerow, Oren Pinhassi and Gerda Scheepers

02.06 – 22.07.2017

Galerie Eva Meyer

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‘Sweaty Hands’ by Agata Ingarden at Exo Exo http://www.ofluxo.net/sweaty-hands-by-agata-ingarden-at-exo-exo/ http://www.ofluxo.net/sweaty-hands-by-agata-ingarden-at-exo-exo/#respond Tue, 20 Jun 2017 22:16:17 +0000 http://www.ofluxo.net/?p=27907 Agata Ingarden’s volumes have emerged into space to create a network of elements that resemble each other, come together and reproduce. At the end of anchored metal structures, ducts or heat pipes, vectors of fossilized sap, an aqueous matter has formed – sticky, sometimes dense, sometimes transparent, but above all, of an unpredictable nature. Altering its density, the caramel which constitutes the matter softens under the influence of heat, de-paralyzing the form to invest it with a new functionality, liquid, colonizing, gravitational. In the silence, we hear a regular sound of drips crashing on the carpet. Defining a scenography of a bourgeois interior, the carpet dresses the floor of a room next door, an inverted ceiling of a utility room or a garage populated with a forest of sugar.

On the floor, two crabs, the matrix of a prehistoric animal, 450 million years old. Their aluminum and copper shells situated discreetly in the corner of the room, in the threshold, seem to crawl in order to penetrate this world. Anachronistic, unreal, they are the ancestral monsters that become nevertheless a feature of the landscape. Like little metal robots, these ‘Still Alive Mates’ are the promise of the future fixed in the past.

In this melting world, they would belong to the genre of representation, of a fossil object. In opposition, the formless monsters hung on their metal arms, would belong to the realm of the living, the organic. Their state of fluctuation places them close to what is human – the desire and its contradiction. To long for and to reject would be the mechanics of the system here orchestrated by the artist. Mechanics related to the mental, in its relation with desire and the body, in its similarities to the functioning of the digestive system. In this big active machine, the heat would obstruct the pipes delivering the caramel and would constitute a clog subjected to humidity, pressure, temperature and sunlight. Mutating, the forms would induce a discomfort close to nausea, an overdose of sugar. Dry, hard, and moist at the same time.

Agata Ingarden was born in 1994 in Cracow, Poland. She lives and works in Paris.
‘Sweaty Hands’ is her first solo show in France.

Agata Ingarden, Sweaty Hands, 2017
Exhibition view, Exo Exo, Paris

Agata Ingarden, Sweaty Hands, 2017
Exhibition view, Exo Exo, Paris

Agata Ingarden, Sweaty Hands, 2017
Exhibition view, Exo Exo, Paris

Agata Ingarden, Sweaty Hands, 2017
Exhibition view, Exo Exo, Paris

Agata Ingarden, Heat Pipes 2, 2017
Steel, enamel, copper, caramel

Agata Ingarden, Heat Pipes 3, 2017
Steel, enamel, copper, caramel

Agata Ingarden, Sweaty Hands, 2017
Exhibition view, Exo Exo, Paris

Agata Ingarden, Still Alive – Mates 4 & 5, 2017
Aluminium, copper

Agata Ingarden, Heat Pipes 4, 2017
Steel, enamel, copper, caramel

Agata Ingarden, Heat Pipes 2, 2017
Steel, enamel, copper, caramel

Agata Ingarden, Sweaty Hands, 2017
Exhibition view, Exo Exo, Paris

Agata Ingarden, Heat Pipes 3, 2017
Steel, enamel, copper, caramel

Agata Ingarden, Heat Pipes 3, 2017
Steel, enamel, copper, caramel

Agata Ingarden, Sweaty Hands, 2017
Exhibition view, Exo Exo, Paris

Agata Ingarden, Sweaty Hands, 2017
Exhibition view, Exo Exo, Paris

Agata Ingarden, Heat Pipes 5, 2017
Steel, enamel, copper, caramel

Agata Ingarden, Sweaty Hands, 2017
Exhibition view, Exo Exo, Paris

Agata Ingarden, Sweaty Hands, 2017
Exhibition view, Exo Exo, Paris

Agata Ingarden, Heat Pipes 1, detail, 2017
Steel, enamel, copper, caramel

—-

‘Sweaty Hands’
by Agata Ingarden
at Exo Exo, Paris
June 2 – July 1, 2017

Exo Exo

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‘To Whom It May Concern’ Curated by Mohamed Almusibli http://www.ofluxo.net/to-whom-it-may-concern-curated-by-mohamed-almusibli/ http://www.ofluxo.net/to-whom-it-may-concern-curated-by-mohamed-almusibli/#respond Tue, 20 Jun 2017 10:31:38 +0000 http://www.ofluxo.net/?p=27858 Installation view

Installation view

Installation view

Gilles Jacot – Teeth Poems illustration, 2016-2017, acrylic on paper

Gilles Jacot – Teeth Poems illustration, 2016-2017, acrylic on paper

Haydée Marin Lopez – Untitled Triptic, 2017, watercolor on foamboard

Haydée Marin Lopez – Untitled Triptic, 2017, watercolor on foamboard

Samuel Koch – Schemes for Birds, 2017, plexiglass

Samuel Koch – Schemes for Birds, 2017, plexiglass

Samuel Koch – Schemes for Birds, 2017, plexiglass

Martina Mächler – Performance Review BA (10/2013 – 02/2017), 2017, print on paper

Martina Mächler – Performance Review BA (10/2013 – 02/2017), 2017, print on paper

Léo Bachiri Wadimoff – Responsabilité, 2017, print on paper

Deanna Havas – Free People, 2017, macramé (knotted strings)

Deanna Havas – Free People, 2017, macramé (knotted strings)

Melanie Akeret – Portfolio 2015-2017, 2017, mixed media

Melanie Akeret – Portfolio 2015-2017, 2017, mixed media

Melanie Akeret – Portfolio 2015-2017, 2017, mixed media

Bruno Zhu – Shy Manager, Sly Manager, Brash Influencer, Smooth Operator, 2017, textile with accessories

Bruno Zhu – Shy Manager, Sly Manager, Brash Influencer, Smooth Operator, 2017, textile with accessories

Bruno Zhu – Shy Manager, Sly Manager, Brash Influencer, Smooth Operator, 2017, textile with accessories

– – –

To Whom It May Concern

w/ Melanie Akeret, Deanna Havas, Gilles Jacot, Samuel Koch, Martina Mächler,
Haydée Marin Lopez, Léo Bachiri Wadimoff and Bruno Zhu

Curated by Mohamed Almusibli

Toni- Areal – 4.T09
Zurich (CH)

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“New England’s Dark Day” by Michael Assiff & Dennis Witkin at Hotel Art Pavilion http://www.ofluxo.net/new-englands-dark-day-by-michael-assiff-dennis-witkin-at-hotel-art-pavilion/ http://www.ofluxo.net/new-englands-dark-day-by-michael-assiff-dennis-witkin-at-hotel-art-pavilion/#respond Mon, 19 Jun 2017 18:54:54 +0000 http://www.ofluxo.net/?p=27832 On May 19th, 1780, a strange phenomenon happened in New England: the sun never came out and the day remained as dark as night. We know about New England’s Dark Day because of two types of records that describe it. One is filtered through human experience; texts written in 1780 describe residents in panic, assuming that dark skies could only be interpreted as a sign of the end times. Deacon Samuel Gatchel wrote of the “imminent fulfillment of prophecy” in a text verbosely titled The Signs of the times: or Some expositions and remarks of sundry texts of Scripture, relative to the remarkable phenomenon, or dark-day, which appears in New-England on the nineteenth of May, 1780. Other written reports (there were many) mention unusual responses to the dark day from the natural world: flowers folded their petals, night birds came out to sing while day birds slept, chickens retreated to their roost, cattle returned to their stalls, and frogs croaked as they did at midnight.

In the centuries that followed, we learned of another way to describe the event that took place on New England’s Dark Day through the use of scientific reasoning. Found within the trunks of trees in Ontario’s forests were rings scared with charcoal and resin, indicating that widespread forest fires in Canada caused a thick, dark cloud of smoke to prevent daylight from reaching much of New England.

Artists Michael Assiff and Dennis Witkin have found fertile common ground within the story of New England’s Dark Day. For Assiff, the phenomenon—or perhaps more accurately, the light that science and hindsight has retroactively cast on the phenomenon—provides a parallel to the collective panic we find ourselves in today, in part due to ecological crises too often thought of as independent of human interference and scientific analysis. For Witkin, the 16th-century illustrative engravings and texts produced by New England’s residents provide a poetic backdrop for his work, which often involves antiquated technologies like bells, weathervanes, and lamp posts. Their two-person exhibition is the inaugural exhibition for Hotel Art Pavilion. The artist-run gallery is the second phase of a curatorial initiative, hotel-art.us, that was founded in 2012 and produced primarily for online audiences.

A welcome mat constructed of compressed hardwood ash (a collaborative piece by Assiff and Witkin) lies before the entryway to the gallery, leaving soot on the soles of viewers’ shoes before they walk onto the white floor inside. Amidst ashy footprints sit Witkin’s sculptures: dustpans that seem utilitarian in that they’re depositories for damage, yet their resonance can only be inferred when free of debris. In the dustpans’ basins, the artist has rendered tableaus of landscapes and interior scenes in relief, and the outlines of the objects mimic the waist and yoke of an old bell.

Upon entry to the gallery, a dim red motion-censoring light, obscured by a layer of hairspray and ash on its surface, turns on to mark the presence of a viewer. This piece by Assiff continues the artist’s interest in the flawed logic of energy consumption; the energy-consuming light is unable to perform its task due to the remnants of an over-extracted resource (hardwood trees). Again in reference to logging and extractive economies, Assiff’s wall pieces—hand-carved stretcher bars typically used as the “bones” of a canvas—depict a replica of a statue from the Algonquin Logging Museum in Ontario, located in the forest that had once burnt down and caused New England’s Dark Day.

Michael Assiff (b. 1983, Florida) is an artist who lives and works in Queens, NY. Recent solo shows include Ozone Flowers at Mascota, Mexico City and Remediation Flowers at First Continent, MD. Recent group shows include Helena Anrather, NY, Room East, NY; Jack Hanley, NY and Magenta Plains, NY. Recent curatorial projects include F.E.D.S. at American Medium, NY and a recent presentation at NADA NY with Motel. Upcoming shows include Toxoplasmosis Gondii with Rachel Lord and Jonathan Santoro at High Tide, PA and Pier 1 imports at Valentin, Paris.

Dennis Witkin (b.1992, New York) lives and works in Queens, NY. Recent solo shows include Failure to Thrive and group exhibitions with Sydney, Sydney and 63rd -77th Steps, Bari. Witkin is co-director of Kimberly-Klark in Queens.

“The time of this extraordinary darkness, was May 19, 1780. It came on between the hours of ten and eleven, A.M. and continued until the middle of the next night; but with different appearances at different places. As to the manner of its approach it seemed to appear first of all in the S. W. The wind came from that quarter, and the darkness appeared to come on with the clouds that came in that direction. The degree to which the darkness arose, was different in different places. In most parts of the country it was so great, that people were unable to read common print — determine the time of day by their clocks or watches — dine — or manage their domestic business, without the light of candles. In some places, the darkness was so great, that persons could not see to read common print in the open air, for several hours together. The extent of this darkness was very remarkable. Our intelligence, in this respect, is not so particular as I could wish: but from the accounts that have been received, it seems to have extended all over the New-England states. It was observed as far east as Falmouth. — To the westward, we hear of its reaching to the furthest parts of Connecticut, and Albany. — To the southward, it was observed all along the sea-coasts: — and to the north, as far as our settlements extend. It is probable it extended much beyond these limits, in some directions: but the exact boundaries cannot be ascertained by any observations that I have been able to collect. With regard to its duration, it continued in this place at least fourteen hours: but it is probable this was not exactly the same in different parts of the country. The appearance and effects were such that in response, townspeople gathered in prayer, fearing the end of time. Candles were lighted up in the houses; — the birds having sung their evening songs, disappeared, and became silent; — the fowls retired to roost; — the petals of flowers folded inward; — objects could not be distinguished but at a very little distance; and every thing bore the appearance of night.”

Michael Assiff
Motion Sensor (Forest), 2017
motion sensor light, hardwood ash, acrylic, LED and incandescent bulbs
16 x 8 x 6 inch

Dennis Witkin
Udi’s Direction, 2017
aluminum, epoxy clay, cal-tint, charcoal, polyurethane
21 x 15 x 15 inch

Michael Assiff & Dennis Witkin
Welcome (Mat), 2017
linseed oil, epoxy clay, hardwood ash, burnt and carved plywood
24 x 16 x 1 inch

Michael Assiff
Stretchers (Chevron USA, INC. V Natural Resource Defence Council, INC.), 2017
Linseed oil on carved poplar
16 x 18 inch

Michael Assiff
Stretchers (Chevron USA, INC. V Natural Resource Defence Council, INC.), 2017
Linseed oil on carved poplar
16 x 18 inch

Michael Assiff
Stretchers (People V Brooklyn Cooperage Company), 2017
Linseed oil, latex, and plastic on carved poplar
14 x 18 inch

Michael Assiff
Stretchers (Newfoundland & Laborador V AbitibiBowater, INC), 2017
Linseed oil, latex, and plastic on carved poplar
19 x 20 inch

Michael Assiff
Stretchers (Newfoundland & Laborador V AbitibiBowater, INC), 2017 (Detail)
Linseed oil, latex, and plastic on carved poplar
19 x 20 inch

Dennis Witkin
Dustpan (Factory Floor), 2017
Epoxy clay, cal-tint, patina, dried lemon
14 x 18 x 4 inch

Dennis Witkin
Dustpan (Factory Floor), 2017
Epoxy clay, cal-tint, patina, dried lemon
14 x 18 x 4 inch

Dennis Witkin
Dustpan (Hospital), 2017
Epoxy clay, cal-tint, patina
12 x 17 x 3 inch

Dennis Witkin
Dustpan (Hospital), 2017 (Detail)
Epoxy clay, cal-tint, patina
12 x 17 x 3 inch

Dennis Witkin
Dustpan (Hospital), 2017
Epoxy clay, cal-tint, patina
12 x 17 x 3 inch

Dennis Witkin
Dustpan (Group Home), 2017
Epoxy clay, cal-tint, patina, charcoal, gluten free cookie
12 x 16.5 x 4.5 inch

Dennis Witkin
Dustpan (Group Home), 2017
Epoxy clay, cal-tint, patina, charcoal, gluten free cookie
12 x 16.5 x 4.5 inch


“New England’s Dark Day”
by Michael Assiff & Dennis Witkin
at Hotel Art Pavilion

20.5.17 — 20.6.17

Hotel Art Pavilion

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‘MILLENNIAL FEMINISMS’ at L’INCONNUE http://www.ofluxo.net/millennial-feminisms-at-linconnue/ http://www.ofluxo.net/millennial-feminisms-at-linconnue/#respond Thu, 15 Jun 2017 11:32:13 +0000 http://www.ofluxo.net/?p=27801 EVERYTHING IS COMPROMISED

Text by Susana Vargas Cervantes

The term millennial in this exhibition refers to a specific generation of women artists who do not shy away from being identified as feminist, and whose work equally deals with traditional understandings of feminism that involve femininity, gender, love, sex and relationships through a consumerist and neoliberalist culture, involving labour, data and new technologies.

To me, what brings together these five international artists under a loose umbrella of feminisms is the methodologies they engaged with to deal with similar themes. While the term millennial might connect us to the use of internet culture and a socially networked world, I find it is equally their humorous approach to love that brings them together in this exhibition.

For example, Beatrice Marchi’s color-pencil drawing entitled Gelato e Tristezza con Panna (Ice Cream and Sadness with Cream), depicts in pastel colors a cartoonish looking couple about to share an ice cream through what is at the same time an open mouth and anus, ready to take a lick of the melting strawberry and vanilla ice cream. This opened mouth/anus could also be read as a cartoonish vagina complete with teeth and lipstick. We only see the couple in a profile, united by this mouth/vagina/anus, one long-lashed eye each, and their tears echo the dripping vanilla ice cream. It is with humour that love and sex and relationships are portrayed. Once in love we started to share an ice cream and now with teary eyes and a melting ice cream we can’t tell through which orifice we are sharing it. It must be very hot.

Athena Papadopoulos’ invents her own methodologies and mediums for her art works. In Honeymoon in Pickle Paradise she is also telling a love and sex story. At a distance a proposal is taking place and the traditional moment in which the bride is carried over the nuptial threshold is visible. The present at hand, here, is more concerned with characters that are not necessarily engaged in a monogamous heteronormative relation, they are clearly having more fun. For instance, one character is waving at us smiling from the bottom of the canvas. The relationship between domesticity, traditionalism and pickle and blindness is further materialized through the materials used: pepto-bismol, smearing condiments and cosmetics into re-dyed fabrics. We know they, the characters and even the frame, came back from the honeymoon in Hawaii because the cotton end of the canvas is braided with beads. Everything is enmeshing in this honeymoon.

The theme of love continues with Anna Uddenberg’s piece Broken Nude Heart, which is an oversize big replica of the necklaces teenage BFFs or teenage lovers wear. The heart must be broken into half for each half to wear it. This heart is bigger than the one you can hang on a chain around the neck. It is nude, and not red, silver or gold, which speaks to me of the first love, one without masks or fears. A heart ready to be torn apart for the sake of love.

Eleni Bagaki’s Now you see me, oh now you don’t and Hi! I am here to hurt you, Vagina is the place where we meet/ do you want to meet?, When you are not here/ I want to fuck somebody else tell the story of an unrequited love and sexual encounters. The installation further plays with this where a sock plays the piano visible in an iPhone 5.

Break-ups, the processes of breaking up are also taken up in Hannah Perry’s video works. In Don’t care 3, the camera is fixed. We are inside Hannah’s bedroom. We see the bed covered in mostly a white duvet. No posters, no desk, it seems a bedroom in a hotel room. A woman, Hannah, in black underwear appears, disappears, turns, jumps, is in and out. The image too breaks up. In many ways we are also living the breakup. It’s a love in recovery, overcoming, praying to “shanti to give the strength to accept the things that can’t be changed.” The end. There is a new skin coming. The video presented on an iPad shows constantly, as a background on the video, the contour of a small handmade red heart, to me, it seems it is painted on a mirror with a lipstick. Script HateMail, can be read as a catharsis of a break up too. “Fragmented memories,” the memories we chose to keep and the ones we need to forget after a breakup. At the beginning a close up of Hanna’s face, all the video in yellows, oranges and reds, the tumultuous anger and rage as an inevitable phase of breakups, and at the end the voice turns to whispering, the narration becomes indistinguishable. The last word I can understand is “choice.”

As if break-ups were not hard enough, in this exhibition the artists engagements with internet culture, social media and networks through iPhones and iPads reminds me that, not necessarily exclusive to millennials, social media makes them even harder. The obsession between following and unfollowing and ex on all social media: Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Tumblr, Snapchat, Pinterest, Periscope, Vine. Blocking, not blocking, returning. It is like Hannah Perry’s Action film, car crash sex scene, Final scene. The end. Only fragments left of a whole and blood still dripping.

It is these heart felt, deep love catharses that make these works gutsy and empowered. This is what we remember as the core of so many different ways of embodying feminisms.

The millennial generation has often been characterized in the media by their lack of involvement with politics and as either post-feminist or focused on liberal feminism. According to Angela McRobbie, post-feminists take feminism into account only to disregard it. Many post-feminists believe that equality has been achieved and now they have a choice and don’t need to fight anymore. On the other hand, liberal feminisms have been characterized as part of the establishment, focusing on “women’s issues” which are reduced to what affects rich white women and not really looking to change the structure as a whole.

I, too, identify as feminist, but feel the need as soon as I identify as such to clearly define what I mean. There are so many ways to embody being a feminist that it is easy to get lost. To me, feminism includes the rights for the poor, for minorities, and trans rights. It includes a struggle that is not only for representation, although that is very important, but mostly for changing the structures of power, the prison-industrial complex, the military state, and the financial arrangements that control governments.

James Baldwin stated “love, or, rather, our ‘deep participation with each other,’ might very well be the affective force necessary to move us beyond neoliberalist preoccupations with the self, which is really a disdain of “the social” and the collective. It is the deep participation with each other in community that is powerful, as opposed to the type of separation (between people and nation states) that neoliberalism engenders”.

I believe it is feminism that provides the methodology to do so. The approaches and methodologies of the works presented here continue to take much of the DYI culture part of the first wave of feminism. Curator Sarah McCutcheon Greiche has been focusing on feminist art since then. In 1979, she curated Womens’ Bookworks a touring show in Canada that originated from Powerhouse Gallery in Montreal, and in 2006 she continued this focus in the exhibition Beyond Feminism also in Montreal at the Parisian Laundry Gallery.

McCutcheon Greiche, identifies as a feminist and for whom the feminist revolution has actually not totally happened. “Feminism is still an issue” pioneer feminist American video and performance artist Joan Jonas confirmed to curator, as she took this statement as a point of departure to curate this exhibition. McCutcheon Greiche wanted to focus on the new generation of artists for whom feminism is “still a central concern, and it is communicated through a layering of ideas about contemporary life, surveillance, consumerism, globalism, sexuality and relationships.” From her first show to now not much has changed, on the contrary: “the stronger sex remains stronger – in the bedroom, in the workplace, on the streets, in politics, in religion and now on the net”. So when she met this new generation of artists whose works she describes as “gutsy” and “empowered” it was time for a new feminist show: millennial feminisms.

 

BEATRICE MARCHI
Amiche, diptych
pastel on paper, framed
23.5 x 13.75 inches
2016
Courtesy of the artist and Downs&Ross, New York

BEATRICE MARCHI
Gelato e Tristezza con panna
coloured pencil on paper, framed
8.3 x 11.7
2016
Courtesy of the artist and Downs&Ross, New York

ELENI BAGAKI
Torso
printed image on vinyl, aluminum, towel, unframed
23.6 x 18.9 inches
2016

ELENI BAGAKI
Hi! I am here to hurt you
Vagina is the place where we meet/ do you want to meet?
When you are not here/ I want to fuck somebody else
3 Text works printed on office paper
11 x 8.5 inches
2016

ELENI BAGAKI
Now you see me, oh now you don’t
Sock tune, HD, single channel, sound, duration sec 25, white socks, A4 paper
2016

ANNA UDDENBERG
Broken Nude Heart
styrofoam, fiberglass, aqua resin, paint, steel chain, motor
2014

HANNAH PERRY
Action film, car crash sex scene, Final scene. The end,
liquid latex, car parts
54 x 39 x 15 inches
2016

ATHENA PAPADOPOULOS
Untitled
Rabbit fur, image transfers, nail polish, hair dye, wool, wadding, jewelry chain, thread, silk, resin, various objects, claw coated in resin and nail polish, hardware
18 x 7 inches
2016
Athena Papadopoulos (collaboration with Monster Coat Club)

ATHENA PAPADOPOULOS
Honeymoon in Pickle Paradise, (Temptation Island) V (left) & I (right)
image transfers, Pepto Bismol, Berocca, acrylic beads, tin foil, thread and glue on cotton/linen blend over mesh and canvas
20.4 x 23.2 inches each
2014

ATHENA PAPADOPOULOS
Honeymoon in Pickle Paradise, (Temptation Island) VI (left) & II (right)
image transfers, Pepto Bismol, Berocca, acrylic beads, tin foil, thread and glue on cotton/linen blend over mesh and canvas
20.4 x 23.2 inches each
2014

ATHENA PAPADOPOULOS
The Scab, (PAPA)
Image transfers on fabric, fleece, wool, mesh, hair dye, lipstick, henna, nail polish, Pepto Bismol, stuffing, thread, self tanner,
resin based glue, synthetic hair, wood, nails, crows feet
2016

MILLENNIAL FEMINISMS
At L’INCONNUE, Montreal
April 19 – July 15, 2017
w/ Eleni Bagaki, Beatrice Marchi, Athena
Papadopoulos, Hannah Perry, Anna Uddenberg.
Curated by Sarah McCutcheon Greiche.

L’INCONNUE

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Antoine Donzeaud, It’s our Playground, Jocelyn Villemont, VALENTIN @ MonChéri, Brussels http://www.ofluxo.net/antoine-donzeaud-its-our-playground-jocelyn-villemont-valentin-moncheri-brussels/ http://www.ofluxo.net/antoine-donzeaud-its-our-playground-jocelyn-villemont-valentin-moncheri-brussels/#respond Tue, 13 Jun 2017 11:10:56 +0000 http://www.ofluxo.net/?p=27767 Exhibition view

Jocelyn Villemont
“Skin Graft 8012017-2”,2017
Canvas, cable ties.
31 1/2 x 47 1/4 x 3 15/16 Inches / 80 x 120 x 10 cm.

Exhibition view

Antoine Donzeaud
Untitled Still Life (her curves)”, 2017
Metal, spray paint, mosquito net.
80 7/10 x 55 9/10 Inches. / 205 x 142 cm

Exhibition view

Antoine Donzeaud
“White Ferrari”,2017
HD video, metal, spray paint.
8’06” loop.

Antoine Donzeaud
“White Ferrari”, 2017
Video HD
8’06”

Antoine Donzeaud
“White Ferrari”,2017
HD video, metal, spray paint.
8’06” loop.

Exhibition view

Antoine Donzeaud
“Mobile Transparencies (you can’t catch flies with honey)”,2017
Metal, spray paint, mosquito net.
80 7/10 x 55 9/10 Inches. / 205 x 142 cm

Exhibition view

It’s Our Playground
“Brain content (above)”,2016
UV print on dibond
35 7/16 x 38 3/5 Inches. / 90 x 98 cm.

Jocelyn Villemont
“Refresh Model C-BP & Skin Grafts”,2017
Aluminum, polycarbonate, terry cloth, clock, thermometer, rubber, steel, canvas, cable tie
65 x 70 7/8 x 3 15/16 Inches. / 165 x 180 x 10 cm

Exhibition view

Antoine Donzeaud
“Untitled Still Life (her curves)”,2017
Metal, spray paint, mosquito net.
80 7/10 x 55 9/10 Inches. / 205 x 142 cm

Exhibition view

Exhibition view

It’s Our Playground
“Brain content (above III)”,2016
UV print on dibond
34 9/14 x 38 3/5 Inches. / 88 x 98 cm.

Exhibition view

It’s Our Playground
“Brain content (above II)”,2016
UV print on dibond
35 7/16 x 38 3/5 Inches. / 90 x 98 cm.

Exhibition view

Jocelyn Villemont
“Refresh Model A-WG”,2016
Aluminium, polycarbonate, tic-tac, clocks, terry cloth, steel
59 x 11 13/16 x 2 3/4 Inches. / 150 x 30 x 7 cm

Exhibition view

Antoine Donzeaud
“Mobile Transparencies (sucer des bonbons à la menthe)”,2017
Metal, spray paint, mosquito net.
80 7/10 x 55 9/10 Inches. / 205 x 142 cm

VALENTIN @ MonChéri

Antoine Donzeaud, It’s our Playground, Jocelyn Villemont
@ monCHÉRI, Brussels
From June. 1st, 2017

© Photo: Benoit Cattiaux / Courtesy of the artist and monCHÉRI, Brussels

MonChéri

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